Hi :) I'm a fashion design student who likes to draw and write and stuff. Sometimes I post that here, but mostly I just fangirl.

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flyaway-freedom-heart:

h0bbitberry:

simonwang:

Twilight in two seconds

This is the only twilight thing I will ever reblog. 

I have been waiting for this gif

flyaway-freedom-heart:

h0bbitberry:

simonwang:

Twilight in two seconds

This is the only twilight thing I will ever reblog. 

I have been waiting for this gif

(Source: niallers-angel)

Jul 29th at 1PM / via: oak23 / op: niallers-angel / reblog / 367,240 notes

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)
Jul 29th at 1PM / via: oak23 / op: wesleywalesandersons / reblog / 10,670 notes

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)
Jul 29th at 1PM / via: oak23 / op: wesleywalesandersons / reblog / 10,670 notes
  • police officer: you're under arrest for shooting someone in the chest
  • me: whoever made the rhyme did the crime(:
  • police officer: haha i have to give you credit for that one dude you're off the hook
Jul 29th at 1PM / via: pizza / op: officialwhitegirls / reblog / 29,114 notes

no1twerkslikegaston:

unamusedpancake:

My wedding vow-

Me: prepare for trouble
Him: and make it double
Me: to protect the world from devastation
Him: to unite all peoples within our nation
Me: to denounce the evils of truth and love
Him: to extend our reach from the stars above
Me: *name*
Him: *name*
Me: team *last name* blast off at the speed of light
Him: surrender now or prepare to fight
The priest: MEOWTH THAT’S RIGHT

omg

  • WiFi: connected
  • Me: then fucking act like it
Jul 29th at 12PM / via: commiekinkshamer / op: gay-writes / reblog / 186,115 notes
New hair! :D (at eagle point, albany)

View in High Quality →

New hair! :D (at eagle point, albany)

Jul 29th at 12PM / reblog / 1 note

oak23:

"Jem was ridiculous anyway, why should you care"

Jul 28th at 8PM / via: oak23 / op: oak23 / reblog / 3 notes
Anonymous: What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

middleclassreject:

dysonrules:

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

REBLOG FOREVER.

Boycott this fucking movie, for the love of god. These kinds of ideas are dangerous and set us back as a society 

Jul 28th at 8PM / via: littlespacethings / op: aconissa / reblog / 100,654 notes

askgeorgebush:

petition to change the word ‘graveyard’ to ‘skeleton farm’

Jul 28th at 8PM / via: breadmaakesyoufat / op: askgeorgebush / reblog / 9,374 notes

baconnnnnnn:

every time i see that pic of nash grier kissing that guy all i can think of is

image

Jul 28th at 8PM / via: moistbottom / op: baconnnnnnn / reblog / 8,194 notes

shinymeowstic:

australia is a shitty country, with a shitty government and a stained human rights record
never forget that, ever
this country has killed so many its supposed to take care of - and stole the land, and now denies the land to those who have no where else to go.
destroy the notion that australia is a good country, it is not

Jul 28th at 7PM / via: imthejb / op: shinymeowstic / reblog / 882 notes

you need to tell yourself honey… is he really cute? or is he just a white with a visible jawline?

(Source: marimopet)

Jul 28th at 7PM / via: moistbottom / op: marimopet / reblog / 28,424 notes

juliansballclenchingfalsetto:

*debates whether to buy something* *imagines aziz ansari saying “treat yo self”* *treats self*

(Source: emojustinyoung)

Jul 28th at 3PM / via: spohphie / op: emojustinyoung / reblog / 96,622 notes
Jul 28th at 11AM / via: riellekilljoy / op: riellekilljoy / reblog / 26 notes